Embedding contextualisation in English and mathematics GCSE teaching

‘Embedding contextualisation in English and Mathematics GCSE teaching’ trained English and Maths teachers to use real life and vocational contexts and examples in their teaching, to emphasise the relevance of studies to the future careers of students re-sitting GCSE English and/or Maths.

school

Cross curriculum

Subject

accessibility

Key Stage 5

Key stage

EEF Summary

The EEF funded this evaluation to build the evidence base on contextualised learning, An EEF review into post-16 approaches suggested that an integrated, contextualised approach could be more accessible and engaging to vocational students who struggled with GCSE Maths than a more traditional academic approach. Since 2014, students without a good pass in English and Maths GCSE (a ‘4’ or higher under the new GCSE grading system) must continue to study these subjects until they are 18, or secure a qualification in them.

This pilot study found limited increases in the use of contextualised learning in the classroom. It was therefore difficult to assess whether the intervention had an impact on outcomes like retention and attainment. The intervention helped to raise the profile of contextualisation among teachers and senior leaders, however teachers reported concerns about the challenge of applying contextualised knowledge to a non-contextualised GCSE exam.

EEF has no plans for a further trial of ‘Embedding contextualisation’ but will continue to consider other projects which aim to improve English and Maths outcomes for students re-sitting their GCSE exams. 

Research Results

Question

Finding

Comment

Is there evidence to support the theory of change?

Mixed

There is some evidence that the project raised awareness of contextualisation among teachers and senior leaders. However, there was limited increase in the use of contextualised learning post training. This meant that it was difficult to assess the impact of the intervention on pupil outcomes.

Was the approach feasible?

Mixed

All providers completed the training days, though with substantial variation in the number and proportion of participating teachers. Providers generally supported the idea of using contextualised learning to improve pupil motivation, however, the evaluation identified a number of barriers including the high time commitment required, concerns about students’ ability to apply contextualised knowledge in the non-contextualised GCSE exam, and some students’ lack of interest in their vocational area.

Is the approach ready to be evaluated in a trial?

No

Changes need to be made to the intervention before it is ready to be trialled. These changes may include the provision of additional resources, changes to the structure of sessions, and more clarity over the expectations of participating staff.

Evaluation info

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Schools

6

Pupils

-

Key Stage

Key Stage 5

Start date

March 2017

End date

July 2019

Type of trial

Pilot Study

Evaluation Conclusions

  1. Overall, the increase in the use of contextualised learning in the classroom was limited and it was therefore difficult for teachers to assess whether the intervention had an impact on outcomes like retention and attainment. 

  2. The intervention helped to raise the profile of contextualisation among teachers and senior leaders. Further education teachers and senior leaders generally supported the idea of using contextualised learning to improve pupil motivation and believed in the potential of this type of intervention.

  3. Teachers reported concerns about the challenge of applying contextualised knowledge to a non-contextualised GCSE exam. They also reported students’ tendency to respond better to real-life, rather than vocational, contextualisation due to a lack of interest in their vocational area. 

  4. The intervention required teachers to attend four full-day training sessions. This was considered to be a significant investment, and may have been more attractive for settings if the training days had been more time-effective and were shown to have proven impact. 

  5. If the intervention is taken forward for wider rollout, it needs significant changes. These could include the provision of additional resources, changes to the structure of sessions, and more clarity about the expectations of participating staff. 


  1. Updated: 11th July, 2019

    Printable project summary

    1 MB pdf - EEF-embedding-contextualisation-in-english-and-mathematics-gcse-teaching.pdf

  2. Updated: 11th July, 2019

    Pilot report

    924 KB pdf - AELP.pdf

  3. Updated: 30th October, 2017

    Evaluation protocol

    601 KB pdf - AELP_protocol_2017.10.30.pdf

Full project description

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